40 Life Hacks To Use For Camping Out


Going Camping will always be one of the absolute best time of your life, no matter when or how you go, why? Because Life is meant to be lived fully, and part of living is to go exploring and fulfilling your curiosity, since that's what make you Human. And being Human is great and wonderful, if you know how to enjoy life. But first, there are certain things that you must know about any camping environment, such as... Did You Know That:


  1.  Ticks must be connected to their hosts for at least a day and a half–36 hours–to pass Lyme disease.
  2.  In 2009 alone, there were more than 30,000 reported cases of Lyme disease.
  3. Niagara Falls actually consists of three sets of waterfalls. Canada’s Horseshoe Falls are the longest with a 2,600 foot brink, while the connected American and Bridal Veil falls have a 1,060 foot brink. In total, 750,000 gallons of water run over the falls every second.
  4. A mouse can squeeze through an incredibly small space thanks to its soft skull. Zip up your tent at night–if there are holes bigger than a ballpoint pen, a mouse can get in.
  5. It is a myth that fish can be humanely killed with ice water. According to Australia’s RSPCA, the most humane way to kill fish is to strike them in the head with a blunt instrument or to spike the fish.
  6. You can tell the temperature by listening to a cricket chirping. Count the number of chirps in 14 seconds and add 40 for the temperature in Fahrenheit.
  7. The record high temperature in the United States was recorded in Death Valley, California at 134 degrees Fahrenheit.
  8. The record low temperature in the United States was recorded in Prospect Creek, Alaska at -79.8 degrees Fahrenheit.
  9. Black bears can run at speeds of up to 35 miles per hour. They also have an incredible sense of smell, so take appropriate precautions when camping in bear territory.
  10. The largest wolf species in North America grow to about six and a half feet from tail to muzzle.
  11. Mosquitoes can smell the carbon dioxide in a human’s breath from over 100 feet away.
  12. Hardwoods don’t spark, and seasoned hardwoods are ideal for campfires. Many campsites don’t allow you to use wood from the ground, so kiln-treated hardwoods are an essential supply.


And Now, 40 Life Hacks To Use For Camping Out

1.



2. Line your pie iron with foil for easy clean up.

Line your pie iron with foil for easy clean up.
You can go from grilled cheese to apple pie pocket with practically no clean up.

3. Wrapping your meat in cabbage leaves will keep it from getting burnt to a crisp.

Wrapping your meat in cabbage leaves will keep it from getting burnt to a crisp.
The cabbage is dense and moist enough to create the perfect nonstick barrier. No more accidental charred-to-a-crisp meals!

4. A miniature Tic Tac box makes a great miniature tackle box.

A miniature Tic Tac box makes a great miniature tackle box.

5. Adding sage to your campfire or fire pit keeps mosquitoes and bugs away.

Adding sage to your campfire or fire pit keeps mosquitoes and bugs away.

6. Kids can make an adorable and easy keepsake bracelet out of duct tape.

Kids can make an adorable and easy keepsake bracelet out of duct tape.
They can stick things on, like tiny pebbles, flowers, or leaves, and create a souvenir from their nature walk. Just make sure the sticky side is on the outside.

7. Here’s an awesome s’mores hack your kids will love:

Here's an awesome s'mores hack your kids will love:

8. Stovetop popcorn (like Jiffy Pop) can be made over a campfire.

They’re so easy to transport, and kids will be amazed when the foil begins to expand. Just be careful, as the handle will become very hot.
You can also make your own out of popcorn kernels and aluminum foil. Directionshere.

9. Keep extra duct tape for emergencies right on your water bottle.

Keep extra duct tape for emergencies right on your water bottle.

10. Make eggs and bacon in a paper bag.

It’s an easy way to make multiple breakfasts at once. Get the recipe/directions here.

11. Use an acorn cap to loudly whistle for help if you’re lost in the woods.

Use an acorn cap to loudly whistle for help if you're lost in the woods.
Get the step-by-step instructions here.

Or make a willow whistle.

Or make a willow whistle.
Get the instructions here.

12. These compact towels can dry off two people after swimming and are dry to the touch within an hour of use.

These compact towels can dry off two people after swimming and are dry to the touch within an hour of use.
Purchase here.

13. Bailey’s dipped toasted marshmallows are a must for camping.

Bailey's dipped toasted marshmallows are a must for camping.
Toast a marshmallow over hot coals, and then dip the warm marshmallow into a cup of Bailey’s. They’re so delicious and addictive, you’ll want to make them even when you’re NOT camping.

14. Make flaming Jell-O marshmallow shots.

Make flaming Jell-O marshmallow shots.
HOW COOL IS THIS. Fill the marshmallows with a Jell-o mixture and dip into rum. Get the full recipe/directions here.

15. Make a last-minute camping spoon with a knife and a plastic bottle.

Make a last-minute camping spoon with a knife and a plastic bottle.

16. Fill a gallon milk jug with water and 1/4 cup salt to use as a salt block for your cooler.

The jugs mean that you won’t get water all over your food when the ice melts. The salt will make the cold last longer — however, it also means that the water in the jugs won’t double as emergency drinking water.
Read more about it here.

17. Carry your seasonings in straws.

Carry your seasonings in straws.
Just use a lighter to re-seal.

18. You can also keep seasonings, toppings, and condiments separate but organized in stackable pill containers.

You can also keep seasonings, toppings, and condiments separate but organized in stackable pill containers.
Label with a Sharpie.

19. Blue cheese filled bacon-wrapped mushrooms are the savory version of a campfire s’more.

Blue cheese filled bacon-wrapped mushrooms are the savory version of a campfire s'more.
Get the full directions here.

20. This is the coolest tarp trick:

This is the coolest tarp trick:
Use a small stick to help secure the main center line. When pressure is put on one end, the line will tighten evenly, keeping the grommets from being torn out.

21. Pre-make your food and vacuum seal it.

Pre-make your food and vacuum seal it.
It will stay fresh longer and will be easier to pack.

22. Keep your toiletries hooked onto a shower caddy.

Keep your toiletries hooked onto a shower caddy.
You can buy one here for $9.95 or make your own.

23. Slit foam swim noodles lengthwise and slip over each awning strut.

Slit foam swim noodles lengthwise and slip over each awning strut.
Not only are you less likely to bump into them in the dark, but they’ll be padded!
You can also use a pool noodle to cushion a canoe before strapping it to your car to protect from scratching.

24. Carry some emergency TP in an Altoids container.

Carry some emergency TP in an Altoids container.
Especially if you’re going to be venturing off on a hike or nature walk.

25. A 16-ounce water bottle will hold 8–9 large eggs.

A 16-ounce water bottle will hold 8–9 large eggs.
Pre-scrambling your eggs will save you the trouble of having to figure out a way of transporting them. It also eliminates the need for a separate bowl and whisk.

26. This collapsible silicone coffee dripper takes up almost no space.

This collapsible silicone coffee dripper takes up almost no space.
And it has a super high Amazon.com rating. Get it here for $10.99.

27. For fewer burrs, rub the laces of your hiking boots with paraffin before hitting the trail.

28. Corn chips (like Fritos or Doritos) make a great substitute kindling when starting a fire.

Corn chips (like Fritos or Doritos) make a great substitute kindling when starting a fire.
Rusty Shackleford

29. Make an inexpensive candle lantern out of a used tuna can and a candle.

Make an inexpensive candle lantern out of a used tuna can and a candle.
The foil will reflect the light and create more glow. It could potentially block some wind, as well.

30. Silicone cups are unbreakable and super easy to pack.

Silicone cups are unbreakable and super easy to pack.
Get ‘em here.

31. Make toothpaste dots.

Make toothpaste dots.
Spread them out on a plate, let them dry for 2–3 days, and then sprinkle baking soda over them. Once they dry, just pop them into a resealable plastic bag.

32. Keep your TP dry in a CD spindle.

If you’re trying to save space because you’re backpacking, take the tube out and flatten the toilet paper. Keep it in a plastic bag instead.

33. Instant grits will keep ants away from your campsite.

Instant grits will keep ants away from your campsite.
Just sprinkle wherever you see the ants.

34. Use biodegradable trail marking tape so you don’t get lost while hiking.

Use biodegradable trail marking tape so you don't get lost while hiking.
Buy it here.

35. Safely remove a tick with a cotton ball soaked in liquid hand soap.

Keep it on the tick for at least 20 seconds. The tick will cease biting, back out, and will remain stuck to the cotton ball when it’s pulled away. If the tick has been embedded for awhile, keep it in a jar so you can test it for Lyme disease.
[source: Budget101]
Note that there is debate on whether this actually works. Here’s a testimonial that says it does, but there’s no scientific evidence to back it up, so try at your own risk and keep a pair of tweezers in your first aid kit.

36. Your deodorant doubles as a mosquito bite itch queller.

Your deodorant doubles as a mosquito bite itch queller.

37. Make solar camp lanterns out of mason jars and solar disks.

Make solar camp lanterns out of mason jars and solar disks.
Get the full directions here.

38. Johnson’s Baby Creamy Oil doubles as a super effective mosquito repellent.

Johnson's Baby Creamy Oil doubles as a super effective mosquito repellent.
Peggy Wang/BuzzFeed
And you won’t smell like bug repellent.

39. Glue sandpaper to the top of your match holder.

Glue sandpaper to the top of your match holder.
Keeping your matches in a tupperware or stainless container will ensure they don’t get wet.

40. Cobble together a makeshift shower using a large water jug and a watering can head.

Cobble together a makeshift shower using a large water jug and a watering can head.
Get the full directions here.



And Now, Some Of The Best Places To Go Camping:

 
Why It’s Cool: Located in south-central PA, this scenic park sits at the northern tip of the Blue Ridge Mountains in an area known as South Mountain (confusing, we know).The Appalachian Trail, perhaps the most famous foot trail in the world, runs through the forest, which is home to the trail’s halfway point. While only 2,000 people attempt to hike the whole 2,186-mile trail each year (about a quarter actually finish), between two and three million people hike or walk a portion of it.  Whether you do two miles or 20 miles, it’s still cool to say you’ve done it! Have some time after the hike? Check out the Appalachian Trail Museum.
Where to Camp: The forest has a mix of 70 tent and trailer sites (mostly rustic) available from late March to mid-December. Reservations can be made up to 11 months in advance. Backpacking and overnight hikes are not permitted. 
Watch Out For: Pretty safe!
When It’s Open: Park open year round. Campgrounds open from April through December.
Cost: No entrance fee. Campsites range from $4–$5 per person, or $15–$17 per night. For more information visit www.dcnr.state.pa.us/stateparks.
Assateague Island National Seashore, Maryland
Why It’s Cool: If you love beaches, and you love camping, then this is the spot for you. Assateague is a barrier island off the coast of Maryland and Virginia that’s covered in sandy beaches, salt marches, forests, and costal bays. There’s even a community ofwild horses (how exotic!). Enjoy relaxing on the 37 miles of beach or hiking by day, and buckle down your tent right by (err... a safe distance from) the crashing waves for a night under the stars.
Where to Camp: Camping is only allowed on the Maryland side of the island. There are two oceanside and four bayside camping areas available. October 16­ through April 14, the sites are first-come first-served. Two campsites are also open for horse camping during this time. April 15 through October 15, reservations can be made up to 6 months in advance. Backcountry camping is allowed ($5 permit required), but it's only accessible by backpacking or water.
Watch Out For: Nothing too dangerous here — just stay away during hurricane season. Oh, and it’s not a great idea to approach the wild horses.
When It’s Open: Open year round; visitor center and ranger station hours fluctuate from season to season.
Cost: $15 per vehicle entrance fee, valid for seven-days. Annual passes also available for $30. Campsites range from $20 to $30 per night depending on season and location. For more information visit www.nps.gov/asis.

Pacific Coast

Yosemite National Park, California
Why It’s Cool: Nearly 95 percent of the park is designated wilderness — that means no cars, no structures, no roads, and no electricity. After a night spent under the stars,take a hike up to Glacier Point, which overlooks the park’s famous Yosemite Valley, Half Dome (a rock structure revered among climbers), and the High Sierra peaks. The hike on Four Mile Trail from Yosemite Valley to the top of Glacier Point takes about 3-4 hours each way. If you’re looking for something a bit tougher, the Panorama Trail is about twice as long.
Where to Camp: There are 13 popular campgrounds scattered throughout the park, and those requiring reservations are usually full from about April – September. If youdon’t have a reservation for summertime camping, there are seven campgrounds that operate on a first-come first-served basis. Backcountry camping is also allowed, but requires a free wilderness permit (which can be reserved ahead of time). Reservations are recommended.
Watch Out For: Black bears are common — follow appropriate food storage rules!
When It’s Open: Park open year round. Campgrounds vary by season.
Cost: $20 per vehicle entrance fee, valid for seven days. Campsites range from $5 to $20 per night. Wilderness permits are free and required for backcountry camping — there is a $5 per reservation plus $5 per person fee to reserve permits ahead of time. For more information visit www.nps.gov/yose.
Joshua Tree National Park, California
Why It’s Cool: We know — camping in the desert doesn’t sound like so much fun (hello, sunburn). But the famous Joshua Tree National Park is oh so much more than just desert. The park actually sits at the intersection of two very different deserts: To the east is the low-lying Colorado Desert; to the west lies the slightly higher, cooler, wetterMojave Desert (home to the park’s namesake, the Joshua tree). In addition to the deserts, the park also has ten mountain peaks higher than 5,000 feet in elevation. Need to get vertical? Joshua Tree is a popular rock-climbing destination. (Just be sure you know what you’re doing first.).
Where to Camp: The park is home to nine established campgroundsSome campsites require reservations for October through May. The rest of the sites are first come, first served year round. Backcountry camping is allowed, but campers must register in advance at a designated backcountry registration board. 
Watch Out For: Coyotes and ravens. Store food in hard-sided containers to keep wildlife out! And don’t forget to bring enough water — it is a desert, after all.
When It’s Open: Park open year round. Visitor center and campground status vary by season.
Cost: $15 per vehicle entrance fee, valid for seven days. Annual passes are available and national passes are accepted. Campsites range from $10 to $15 per night. For more information visit www.nps.gov/jotr/.
Olympic National Park, Washington
Why It’s Cool: The coolest thing about this park? It contains three different ecosystems, including — wait for it — a rainforest. Head to the Quinault Rainforest (one of only three in the western hemisphere) to see the largest Sitka Spruce tree in the world. There’s a 30-mile road that loops through the rainforest, but we think hiking’s the better option. End your trip at Ruby Beach — where you can see the mountains, glaciers, and rainforests right from the shoreline — or at La Push, the northernmost beach in Washington, where you can see whales off the coast during migration season.
Where to Camp: The park has 16 National Park Service-operated campgrounds with a total of 910 sites. Availability varies from site to site, but there are some primitive sites open year-round. Backcountry camping is allowed, but a Wilderness Camping Permit($5) is required (reservations are also sometimes required).
Watch Out For: Cougars, bobcats, and black bears. Follow food-storage guidelines, keep an eye on your surroundings, and hike with some buddies, if possible.
When It’s Open: Park is open year-round, though some campgrounds and roads close in winter.
Cost: $15 per vehicle entrance fee, valid for seven days. Annual passes and some national passes are also available and accepted. Established campgrounds range from $10 to $18 per night depending on season and location. Wilderness Camping Permitis required for backcountry camping: $5 plus $2 per person, per night. For more information visit www.nps.gov/olym.

Mountain States

Zion National Park, Utah
Why It’s Cool: Remember learning about the pioneers? Yeah, they walked the grounds of Zion (before it was a park). After spending the night in the woods, try hiking the Kolob Canyons in the northwest corner of the park. The five-mile and 14-mile trails make perfect four- or eight- hour trips. The longer trail takes you to Kolob Arch, one of the largest natural arches in the world. (There are also a bunch of backcountry campsites by the arch, and staying out there can make a great two-day backpacking trip.) If you’re traveling in the summer and lucky enough to win a permit in the permit lottery ($5), exploring The Subway of the park is an unparalleled experience. There are two ways to hike the deep valley and underground passageways, both strenuous, nine-ish mile routes. (Be warned — both trips are wet.) 
Where to Camp: The park has three established campgrounds and during the summer, they are full every night. Wilderness permits are required for all overnightbackpacking trips and can be issued the day before or day of your trip (or reserved up to three months in advance). Before embarking on a backcountry trip, be sure to read through the Zion wilderness guide.
Watch Out For: Rattlesnakes and the occasional mountain lion.
When It’s Open: Open year round. Some services and facilities may reduce hours or close at some point during the year.
Cost: $25 per vehicle for a recreational use pass, valid for seven days. Annual and lifetime passes are also available. Wilderness permits are $10 to $20 depending on the size of the group. Campsites range in price from free to $20 per night, depending on the campground and location. For more information visit www.nps.gov/zion.
Glacier National Park, Montana
Photo: National Park Service
Why It’s Cool: The park’s probably known best for Going-to-the-Sun Road, a 50-mile road through the park’s interior that winds through the mountains — but that’s only fun if you’re in a car (and what fun is that, really?). For some fun on foot, try hiking the Many Glacier (there are a few trails to choose from, many of which offer spectacular views of alpine lakes). There’s also a campground at the glacier that accommodates both vehicles and primitive camping.
Where to Camp: There are 13 developed campgrounds with a combined 1,009 established sites. Most operate on a first-come first-served basis, except for three that require reservations. Backcountry camping is also allowed, but a backcountry permit is required and you may only camp in designated backcountry campgrounds. (See theBackcountry Guide for details.)
Watch Out For: Grizzly bears, black bears, and mountain lions. Store food and cooking equipment in a vehicle or hard-sided Intragency Grizzly Bear Committee-approved container, or in a food/storage locker, try to avoid hiking alone, and keep bear spray on hand.
When It’s Open: Park open year round. Visitor facilities open from late May through early September. 
Cost: Entrance fees vary by season from $15 to $25 per car, valid for seven days. Annual and national passes are also available. Campsites vary from $10 to $23 per night during the summer season. For the summer months, backcountry permits are $5 per person (age 16+) per night, plus a $30 reservation processing fee (if reservation is made ahead of time). For more information visit www.nps.gov/glac.

 

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